CARING FOR YOUR COLLIE

The Rough Collie is basically a healthy happy animal, keeping this in mind we hope the following will assist you to keep your new Rough Collie healthy and happy.

Collecting Your New Puppy
 
When you collect your puppy from it’s breeder you should be given an advice pack, including, among other things, a diet sheet, and a record of worming complete with preparations used and when this has been carried out. If your puppy pack does not include this information ask for it.
Feeding
 

There are many different feeding regimes ranging from a diet of natural raw food to commercial dry food, and Collies seem to do well whichever is offered. Most breeders will suggest continuing your puppy’s existing diet for at least the first 4 months, after which any changes should be made very slowly, we would suggest mixing one third of the new food to two thirds of the old every other day for a week or two and then gradually increase the new, always making sure the ‘waste product’ is of the same firm consistency before increasing the new. Once you and your puppy are happy about the new food then please stick to it.  Dogs are not like us, they do not think ‘I had chicken yesterday so I do not want it today’ they just think ‘food’ The only reason you should ever have to change the diet is if your collie has a dramatic change in its faeces.  An adult collie, if fed a commercial diet, does not need a high protein diet unless used for strenuous work (eg: herding sheep), one of around 20% protein is usually adequate for most adult collies.

Grooming
 

Groom at least once a week, paying particular attention to the area behind the ears, between the back legs and under the front legs. Start this as soon as you get your puppy home, making sure you and your puppy enjoy the whole process should help you both to bond well forming a lifelong comfortable relationship. A well groomed puppy will grow up to be an adult that is happy to be groomed and enjoys being handled.

You will find your collie’s coat will be very much easier to care for if, when it is fully grown, it gets plenty of free running. The wind through the coat helps to keep it free of any dirt it has picked up, the fur separates and the whole coat feels healthier.

   
Choosing A Vet
 
It is important that both you and your Collie build a happy relationship with your vet, so choose him/her very carefully. Check out what is available by asking local dog owners, and if you can find a small practice with only one or two vets you will quickly reap the benefits gained by see the same person every time you visit.
   
Training
 

All animals benefit from some form of simple training, and an excellent start can be made by encourage your puppy to be handled daily by stand it on a non slip surface, either a towel or newspaper, running your hands all over its body, checking teeth, look into its ears and feeling between the front and back legs. If this is also done on a table or work top your puppy will quickly becomes relaxed and comfortable whilst in this position, making visits to the vet’s surgery a happy experience, and your vet will always be pleased to see you both as it is much easier to examine a puppy that is calm and relaxed.

It is a good idea to join your local dog club, where you will be given advice on socializing and training your puppy, while make many new friends both for you and your collie. Collies are intelligent animals that benefit from further training which should be tailored to your needs, a good starting point could be working towards the Kennel Club’s Good Citizen Bronze Award, details of supported training schemes from the Kennel Club’s website.

   
Vaccinations
 
Your vet will advise you about any vaccinations your puppy needs and when they should be given on you and your puppy’s first visit, which is when you should also take along the diet sheet and worming record your puppy’s breeder gave you.  
   
Parasites
 

All puppies are born with a round worm burden, many of which will have been eliminated by your breeder’s worming regime, however regular worming becomes your responsibility once you have your puppy home, and your vet will advise you on suitable preparations for both worming and flea control.  It is never advisable to buy ‘over the counter’ remedies as these are rarely as reliable, efficient or safe, see Drug Sensitivity, as those provided by your vet.

Any intended foreign travel should be discussed with your vet well in advance in order that suitable preventative measure against endemic disease born parasites, not found in this country and which can be fatal, may be instituted.

   
Identification
 
It is a legal requirement that all dogs wear a collar and tag stating the owner’s name and address. Many owners prefer to add the additional safeguard of having their pet permanently identified by either Tattoo or Microchip with the animal’s unique number linked to a National Database, which can help re-unite pet and owner should a your dog get lost or stolen.
   
Car Travel
 
Please take your puppy with you in the car as frequently as you possible, short journeys initially, little and often being the way forward.  A harness, designed specifically for the car, is essential if your puppy is to travel on the back seat, a car crate or pet carrier being a better option if you have an estate car.
   
Holidays
 

Whether you intend taking your Collie with you or leaving it at home your pet’s needs are as important as your own at holiday time. If you intend leaving it at home consider whether it is wiser to book your Collie into Boarding Kennels, the best need booking at the same time as your own holiday, or leaving it in the care of a responsible adult in its own environment. It is never advisable to leave it at the home of a friend or relative unless your Collie is completely happy in their environment. If you wish to take your Collie with you, it is now possible to take it abroad providing all the Pet Travel Scheme criteria are met. As the regulations concerning dogs returning to Great Britain are strict and must be followed to the letter, you will need to allow at least 7 months for their completion.

   
And Finally
 

Collie Rescue (Rough and Smooth) is the only official Charity caring for abandoned or neglected Collies of both coats. Currently holding Charitable Status, No: 1001703, it has co-ordinators or helpers in most parts of the United Kingdom. Should anyone feel the need to contact this organisation, either to help raise funds, or in the re-homing of those less fortunate collies, please contact the Secretary.

 

You can download a variety of helpful leaflets from the Kennel Club’s website, following the links on this page will supply more detailed information on the above topics, and if all else fails you can get help and advice on all health and welfare aspects by contacting the Collie Association’s Health Co-ordinator Mrs Anne Hollywood, or any committee member.

Championship Show Class Definitions
 
   
Which class do I enter is a question frequently asked by novice as well as foreign exhibitors, and when one considers the array of classes available at British Shows the question is understandable. British exhibitors have never been restricted to entry in a single class per dog, nor are there any restrictions on the choice of classes entered. On the contrary the class structure, under Kennel Club Rules, is designed to encourage entry into multiple classes, and although few will now enter a puppy right through the classes, as was once all too common, show societies still prefer exhibitors who will enter each dog in several classes.
Class Definitions
 
The class structure at Championship Shows held under Kennel Club rules divides into three main categories:
 
(1)
Classes restricted by age are self explanatory, the only clarification required being that in all cases the minimum and/or maximum age must have been reached on the first day of the show, not the day it is exhibited.
Minor Puppy — for dogs of six and not exceeding nine calendar months of age on the first day of the Show.
Puppy — for dogs of six and not exceeding twelve calendar months of age on the first day of the Show.
Junior — for dogs of six and not exceeding eighteen calendar months of age on the first day of the Show.
Yearling — for dogs of twelve and not exceeding twenty four calendar months of age on the first day of the Show.
Veteran — for dogs of not less than seven years of age on the first day of the Show
 
(2)
Classes restricted by the exhibit’s performance or success at previous shows, before entering any of these classes all previous wins must be carefully calculated, unless specifically excepted in the class definition.
NB: When calculating wins any award which counts towards the title Champion under the rules of any governing body recognised by the Kennel Club shall be counted as a Challenge Certificate for the purposes of entering the following classes.
Beginners — for owner, handler or exhibit not having won a first prize at a Championship or Open Show.
Maiden — for dogs which have not won a Challenge Certificate or a First Prize at an Open or Championship show (Minor Puppy, Special Minor Puppy, Puppy and Special Puppy classes excepted, whether restricted or not).
Novice  — for dogs which have not won a Challenge Certificate or three or more First Prizes at Open and Championship Shows (Minor Puppy, Special Minor Puppy, Puppy and Special Puppy classes excepted, whether restricted or not).
Tyro — for dogs which have not won a Challenge Certificate or five or more First Prizes at Open and Championship Shows (Minor Puppy, Special Minor Puppy, Puppy and Special Puppy classes excepted, whether restricted or not).
Debutant — for dogs which have not won a Challenge Certificate or a First Prize at a Championship Show (Minor Puppy, Special Minor Puppy, Puppy and Special Puppy classes excepted, whether restricted or not).
Under-Graduate — for dogs which have not won a Challenge Certificate or three or more First Prizes at Championship Shows (Minor Puppy, Special Minor Puppy, Puppy and Special Puppy classes excepted, whether restricted or not).
Graduate — for dogs which have not won a Challenge Certificate or four or more First Prizes at Championship Shows in Graduate, Post Graduate, Minor Limit, Mid Limit, Limit and Open classes, whether restricted or not.
Post-Graduate — for dogs which have not won a Challenge Certificate or five or more First Prizes at Championship Shows in Post Graduate, Minor Limit, Mid Limit, Limit and Open classes, whether restricted or not.
Minor-Limit — for dogs which have not won two Challenge Certificates or three or more First Prizes in all at Championship Shows in Minor Limit, Mid Limit, Limit and Open classes, confined to the breed, whether restricted or not at Shows where Challenge Certificates were offered for the breed.
Mid-Limit — for dogs which have not become show Champions under Kennel Club Regulations or under the rules of any governing body recognised by the Kennel Club or won five or more First Prizes in all at Championship Shows in Mid Limit, Limit and Open Classes, confined to the breed, whether restricted or not, at Shows where Challenge Certificates were offered for the breed.
Limit — for dogs which have not become show champions under Kennel Club regulations or under the rules of any governing body recognised by the Kennel Club or won 7 or more First Prizes in all at Championship Shows in Limit and Open Classes confined to the Breed, whether restricted or not at Shows where Challenge certificates were offered for the breed.
Open — for all dogs of the breed for which the class is provided and eligible for entry at the Show.
 
(3)
Classes restricted to dogs having gained awards in a different discipline to the show bench, or special classes for specified groups of dogs.
Field Trial — for dogs which have won prizes, Diplomas of Merit or Certificates of Merit in actual competition at a Field Trial held under Kennel Club or Irish Kennel Club Field Trial Regulations. (This class in limited to Gundogs)
Working Trial — for dogs which have won prizes in competition at a Bloodhound Working Trial and Kennel Club licensed Working Trials, held under Kennel Club Regulations.
Stud Dog — for stud dogs and at least two progeny of which only the progeny must be entered and exhibited in a breed class at the Show.
Brood Bitch — For Brood Bitches and at least two progeny of which only the progeny must be entered and exhibited in a breed class at the Show.
Progeny — for a dog or bitch, accompanied by at least three of its registered progeny.  The dog or bitch not necessarily entered in another class however, all progeny having been entered and exhibited in another class. The dog or bitch and the progeny need not be registered in the same ownership.
Brace — for two exhibits (either sex or mixed) of one breed belonging to the same exhibitor, each exhibit having been entered in some class other than Brace or Team.
Team — for three or more exhibits (either sex or mixed) of one breed belonging to the same exhibit, each exhibitor having been entered in some class other than Brace or Team.
Breeders — for dogs bred by the exhibitor.
Good Citizen Dog Scheme — for dogs that have achieved their GCDS Bronze Award Certificate or above.
Champion — for dogs which have been confirmed a Champion, show Champion or Field Trial Champion.  Champion classes can not be scheduled for individual breeds or varieties of breeds.
 

In breeds where Challenge Certificates are on offer the host show society must classify a Limit and Open class for each sex, otherwise which combination of the above classes a show society offers is entirely up to their own committee, and it would be very surprising if any show society scheduled all of the above classes for even the most popular breeds. Classes listed under 3 above are usually open to more than one breed, many listed as Stake Classes sponsored by a variety of canine orientated companies who supply high value prizes in the form of goods or vouchers.

The classification and definition of classes for shows other than championship shows is slightly different, and you are advised to read the schedule carefully before deciding which classes your collie may be eligible for.

‘The Kennel Club Year Book’ publishes a full classification of all shows complete with their class definitions, along with the Rules and Regulations which govern showing in this country.

 

Rough Collie National Breed Archive
 
   

The Rough Collie is one of the oldest Kennel Club recognised breeds, and although we can often trace a pedigree back to the earliest show Collies, we can only rarely have any idea of their appearance.

The lack of documented, particularly pictorial, evidence of early ancestors has long been a problem breed historians have had to contend with, and accounts for some of the rather misleading accounts about some of our earliest ancestors.

As copying, storing, and cataloguing no longer presents the problems it once did Rough Collie Breed Clubs have combined, through the auspices of the Rough Collie Breed Council, to support a National Breed Archive, and we have asked Dareen Bridge, who readily agreed, to undertake the task of National Rough Collie Breed Archivist.

The Collie Association has always taken a serious interest in the Rough Collie’s history and development, and we have been fortunate in having had so few Secretaries that much of our records are still available. We are therefore proud of being the first Rough Collie Breed Club to donate our own archives for copying and cataloguing by Dareen.
 
Collie Association Contribution
 
Whilst collecting material for this site we have had many interesting items either given or loaned, but non more interesting than this photograph supplied by Mr Trevor Hayward [Foxearth].


Collie Exhibitors at the British Breeds Show – July 1951- Photo: H J Goater

We know that the photograph was taken by H. J. Goater, 10 Normund Mews, West Kensington, London W14, and Trevor was informed by Mrs M. I. (Zoë) Rhys [Hughley], (fifth from the right) who was the Judge that this was the Collie Entry for the ‘British Breeds Show’ either late 40s or early 50s. To the right of Mrs Rhys, wearing what is obviously the Best of Breed rosette and handling a heavily marked blue merle, is Mrs Nadine George [Beulah] and the lady so deeply intent on her two charges to the right of Mrs George is thought to be Miss Clare Molony [Westcarrs], all three of which were Collie Association founder members. The only other members of this line up we can put a name to are the couple on the extreme left, a little divorced from the remaining group, who are thought to be Mr & Mrs Allsop [Wychelms] also prominent Collie Association members.

Clues as to the actual date, include the vehicle behind the lady on the extreme right, who is so intent on making sure each of her three charges is not overlooked, was originally thought to be a Morris Traveller, but is now known to be an Alvis dating from the late 30s. Dareen, who has a background in the fashion industry, dated the costumes of both men and women as mid to late 40s, and Mr Simon Parsons, after researching back issues of Dog World, reveals, in his column ‘In the Dog House’ dated 15 September, the show took place in July 1951 adding the following information:

“… It was an interesting occasion, an open show run at St Edmund’s School, Canterbury by East Kent CS but which was unusually and possibly uniquely confined to the British breeds.

This I guess was the idea of the EKCS’ secretary, the redoubtable Margaret Osborne, whom I suspect many readers will remember as a forthright personality, well-known judge and author and owner of the Shiel affix which was famous in Shetland Sheepdogs, Collies, Corgis and later in the early days of the Briard.

Then, as now, there was concern that the dog world was becoming swamped by breeds of overseas origin, so EKCS decided to fly the flag for the native breeds with this 222-class show. BIS was a Bulldog, Leodride Beau Son, from the Smiths’ famous kennel, under May Pacey, Col Phipps and Tom Scott.

The Collie winners were Mrs George’s Beulah’s Silver Don Mero, and Miss Molony’s Westcarrs Blue Mistletoe and W Whitethroat.

Miss Osborne had gone to great efforts to make this an interesting day out, with a parade of 57 champions, obedience, gundog and working sheepdog demonstrations and a parade of Foxhounds.

The show was supported by many top exhibitors of the day, some travelling a considerable distance — Makes me wonder if one could persuade a general society today to run a show just classifying the vulnerable British and Irish breeds. I’d have thought that if it was in the centre of the country, on a suitable date and was given enough publicity it could draw a paying entry. Worth a try, surely?”

If anyone can add anything further to the above, in particular if you can identify any of the other competitors or supply us with a marked catalogue, which would be returned, we would dearly love to hear about it, please contact either: